Anti-gymnastique; Feldenkrais & BodyMindCentering

Anti-gymanstique is a self-healing method that incorporates physical, emotional and psychological aspects. Students gradually learn about themselves, how their bodies are organized, and how they function.They learn to identify their muscular tensions, develop insights into the possible origins of those tensions – emotional or otherwise – and ultimately discover how to release them.

Developed in the mid 1970s by French physiotherapist, Therese Bertherat, anti-gymnastique – or anti-exercise, as it might be translated in English – has been taught for numerous years in France, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Brazil, Argentina, Spain and Canada. It is a powerful method based on the findings and teachings of French physiotherapist Francoise Mezieres, an expert in human anatomy. Mezieres developed an original approach to Physiotherapy and obtained spectacular results in curing such severe structural conditions as scoliosis. Therese Bertherat was a student of his, and practiced for many years as a Mezieres Physiotherapist before herself designing anti-gymnastique. Her book, The body has its reasons, was her first attempt in describing her philosophy and approach, it sold millions of copies and was translated into several languages.
The Feldenkrais method is an approach to movement developed by Moshe Feldenkrais – a scientist, engineer and Judo instructor – that is based on principles of physics, neurology and physiology. It explores the biological and cultural aspects of movement and how our habits can inhibit our potential. Feldenkrais understands that through our personal experiences; upbringing; culture; injuries; illnesses etc we adopt patterns of physical and psychological behaviour that become embedded in our nervous systems and often become dysfunctional creating physical and psychological limitations. The approach therefore seeks to free us from these habitual restrictive patterns and enable new ways of thinking, moving and feeling to emerge using a process of organic movement and learning.